Join Me for a Special Interview – Jacqueline Brodnitzki

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Stress has reached a global breaking point – it has become part of the collective norm.  Stress is costly to organizations and individuals, causing decreased effectiveness and performance, lack of productivity, reduced profits, serious health issues and unhappiness.  You have the key to reduce your own stress.  You can be more productive, more effective and happier.  It’s not hard, it just takes focus and practice.  Learn how to handle difficult situations with ease, how to accomplish more, and how to enjoy your work and life by being in your flow more often.

Join me in this 40 minute webinar with Jacqueline Brodnitzki, author of Conscious Success: The 5 Step Process To Dissolve Stress, Increase Productivity and Find Your Flow At Work. Jacqueline combines 15 years of corporate management and training expertise with 10 years of teaching and coaching of focus and productivity techniques to help companies increase employee performance, engagements and profits. Her programs are used by companies to train individuals on working together more effectively to support Inclusion and Diversity programs. Clients include Cisco, Verizon and EMC.

Jacqueline is a sought-after speaker on getting more done while losing the drama. She writes a weekly column called Monday Minute which provides energy and time saving tips and productivity techniques. Complimentary subscriptions are available on her site.

She has published two books, two CDs and two virtual courses. Jacqueline is also the host of She’s Got It! the show on the UR Business Network sharing female executives’ leadership tips and lessons learned.

Stacey Alcorn is the author of REACH! and Tuned In. She is a business strategy and sales consultant for large corporations and Global Fortune 100 Firms. She is also a keynote speaker, blogger, trainer, and start-up consultant. Her sales training products have been licensed by hundreds of organizations around the world who use her one-of-a kind sales training materials as the genesis for their own brand growth. Make sure to sign up here for my REACH! Weekly News for awesome interviews with Leaders & Visionaries that I only share with my VIP members.

This Is Why You Won’t Get Hired – Part II

As a follow up to my popular article, This is Why You Won’t Get Hired – Part I, today I offer five more tips to getting the job you want. In today’s employment climate you must must have a strategy to rise to the top of employment candidates.  This article shall serve as that strategy.

Here are five additional tips to getting the job you want:

1. Take an Interest – What do you know about the person who is hiring you?  Have you, at a minimum, Google searched the name of the person in charge of your destiny?  Do they have kids?  Do they volunteer their time?  Do they love to golf?  People like people who are like them.  You want to go into the hiring process highlighting the similarities you have to the person that is hiring you.  If your kids are both All-Star basketball players you have just increased your likelihood of getting the job.  If you think this kind of background stuff doesn’t matter, you are totally wrong.  You must figure out your commonalities because often times it is your kinship with the hiring manager that will matter more than your resume.  By the way, what if you don’t know who the hiring manager is? Figure it out!  You probably at least know the name of the company you are applying for a position with.  Do a little bit of research to find out who is in charge of hiring and then start linking up everything you have in common.

2. Take an Interest Part II – What do you know about the company you are applying for a position with?  Were they recently awarded a big government contract?  What’s the company’s mission statement?  Has the company been featured in any press articles?  Does the company have a blog that shares what’s happening at the firm?  Make it your job to know everything you can about the company.  In the Google world we live in, this does not take a significant amount of time.  However, this legwork can make the difference between getting the job and not. I would estimate that 99% of the candidates for the job will know little to nothing about the company they are applying for the job with.  This lack of knowledge speaks volumes about the candidate.  What it says to the hiring manager is that the candidate is applying for several jobs and this is just another interview.  The candidate who demonstrate clear knowledge about the company says, “I care enough about this job to know everything there is to know.”  Who wouldn’t want to hire someone like that?

3. Who Do You Know At That Company – If you know someone that already works at the company you are applying with, you are CRAZY if you do not reach out to that person and ask for an endorsement.  Someone cheering you on from the inside can make all the difference in the world when it comes to getting hired.  This is why I am a huge fan of LinkedIn.  LinkedIn makes it really easy to figure out if you have any connections to the company you are applying with. Even if you don’t personally know someone working at the company, there may be a chance that you know someone who knows someone who works there.  Reach out and ask the person you know to put in a good word for you with their contacts at the company.   My good friend recently applied for a job at a large company in our area.  I had three connections to people that already work in that firm, one in the human resource department, one in high level executive position, and one in engineering.  I reached out to all three because she asked me to.  She ended up getting the job!  Was it because I knew three people there?  Who knows!  It certainly didn’t hurt her chances to have those endorsements

4. What Qualities Are Required of the Position? – I’ve hired hundreds of employees for my businesses and there are some things that I never put into a job advertisement.  Let me give you an example.  I was recently in the process of hiring someone as a recruiter.  A recruiter is someone that must be aggressive.  They must never take no for an answer.  They must be willing to pick up the phone and make difficult calls.  Now, the advertisement I placed specifically asked the applicants to submit their resumes by email.  However, my contact information was shared on the site.  I can tell you that the last thing I wanted was someone who was going to submit their resume by email.  In fact, anyone that just followed the rules I laid out had automatically disqualified themselves from the job.  For that position, I wanted someone to break the rules, to pick up the phone, and call me.  So, what kind of qualities do you believe the hiring manager is looking for?  Often times the job posting is merely a rouse to disqualify potential applicants.

5. Volunteer – It is not unusual for hiring managers to have to field through hundreds of resumes to fill just one position.  This means that your resume will get a very quick glance before it goes into the trash or into a pile of potential candidates.  If there’s one thing that can get you quickly put into the “potential” list it is volunteer work.  I mention this because this is one thing which many choose to omit from their resume all together.  If you volunteer for your church, community, or charitable organization you should say so.  It gets you one step closer to the job you want and it will certainly never hinder your chances.

Reach out and share your stories.  What did you do to get the job of your dreams?  Inquiring minds want to know!

Stacey Alcorn is the author of REACH! and Tuned In. She is a business strategy and sales consultant for large corporations and Global Fortune 100 Firms. She is also a keynote speaker, blogger, trainer, and start-up consultant. Her sales training products have been licensed by hundreds of organizations around the world who use her one-of-a kind sales training materials as the genesis for their own brand growth. Make sure to sign up here for my REACH! Weekly News for awesome interviews with Leaders & Visionaries that I only share with my VIP members.

I Can’t See You – Remote Employees

Recently I had the opportunity to strategically consult a large company which had hundreds of employees working remotely. This company has offices spread throughout several states and they were facing a challenge because data clearly demonstrated that the employees that reported to the office for duty each day were 25% more productive than the remote employees. At first glance, the solution seems easy, right? Stop accommodating for remote employees! Make all the employees come to the office. Well, there are many reasons why this is not a viable answer. Their concerns included, they didn’t have the bricks and mortar to hold all their employees, contractually they couldn’t now require hundreds of employees to report to an office for duty each day, and last but not least, a change like that would have crushed company morale.

I share this story because this problem is not uncommon. Across every industry we are seeing a higher percentage of remote employees cropping up. This should be good for big business because it can mean lower overhead since the square footage of office space needed per employee is dramatically reduced. Good-bye empire sized office buildings! The problem of productivity however needs to be addressed.

How did we help this company so that productivity of remote employees is now almost exactly in line with those that come to the office?

1. Ask! – First, my team created and conducted a survey with a percentage of both remote and in-office employees. We asked questions about their daily schedule, managing interruptions, and what they love and hate about their jobs. What was interesting to note is that survey results showed that a high percentage of the remote employees knew they were struggling with productivity and were having difficulty managing interruptions at home, even though they had not been given the statistics that the company had shared with us. In other words, the remote employees said, “We are struggling with productivity and we don’t know how to fix it!” What we learned by conducting the surveys was that the remote employees acknowledged the difficulties that go along with working remotely and they were as anxious to find a better way to work as the management team was.

2. Teach – In response to our surveys we immediately went to work creating Online Interactive Learning based training programs for remote employees on how to stay productive when working from home. For example, we taught these employees how to create cues for their family. A cue is something to let everyone else in the house know that they are on work time and can’t be interrupted. A cue can be a sign hanging on the wall, a particular hat the employee might wear while he or she is in “work mode”, or a flag hanging from their office door. We taught these employees how to teach their family how to support their job as a remote employee. We also offered up several tools that remote employees could use to increase productivity. For example Toggl is a free app where employees can time their daily tasks. Many use this app to stay on point and focused during long and complicated projects. There were a series of six Online Interactive Learning programs offered over several months and all of them were specifically tailored to remote employees. Remote employees are great for companies, as long as companies offer training for them on how to be great when working from home.

3. Community – What if remote employees could be MORE productive than those that come to the office each day? That’s where this company we are working with is headed. In fact, we worked with them to build an awesome community site for their team, kind of like a Facebook for the company. It is a site that every employee in the company engages in and it creates a sense of community for the team. It is a spot where every employee gets to see what the other looks like and it’s a place where they can collaborate on projects, offer ideas, and create relationships with the other team members. Employee engagement is absolutely necessary when building any business. It’s easy when all of your employees are under one roof. The challenge is building engagement when the team is spread throughout the country or even the world. An in-house social site is one way to create those bonds that tie the employee network together. Bonds are created amongst the employees, across all levels of hierarchy, and to the company as a whole.

Remote employees are often cut from the very same cloth as those that come to the office each day. They want to meet their quotas, enjoy their work, and be productive. Sometimes they just need a little guidance on how to do that. If you are struggling with productivity at your firm, have a conversation with your people. Then teach them how to work from home. As well, find ways to instill that sense of community, because if you can do that, your remote employees may very well outshine those that trudge their way to the office each day.

Stacey Alcorn is the author of REACH! and Tuned In. She is a business strategy and sales consultant for large corporations and Global Fortune 100 Firms. She is also a keynote speaker, blogger, trainer, and start-up consultant. Her sales training products have been licensed by hundreds of organizations around the world who use her one-of-a kind sales training materials as the genesis for their own brand growth. Make sure to sign up here for my REACH! Weekly News for awesome interviews with Leaders & Visionaries that I only share with my VIP members.

This is Why You Won’t Get Hired – Part I

Myth: The best job candidate will always get the job.

Fact: Millions of awesome job candidates can’t find work.  Why?  Just because you’d excel at the job, doesn’t mean that you will excel at getting it.  What’s more important?  Getting the job or doing it well?  The answer – getting the job.  Since I’m sick and tired of watching awesome employees lose out on amazing job opportunities, I’m about to share with you an insiders guide to getting hired.

Hiring good employees is like putting your chips on 9 Red on the Roulette table in Vegas.  The process of hiring a new employee is daunting.  The goal is to hire someone that will fit perfectly within the position, will excel at the job, and will get along with other employees and sales team members. After twenty years of hiring employees, I now realize that, just like Roulette, there are ways to insure your risk.   Having just completed a new round of hiring for a position as my personal business manager, I am once again totally shocked, dismayed, and flabbergasted by the quality of applications/resumes received.  This article shall serve to become a manifesto to getting the job you want, or not.  Knowing that business owners and hiring managers are insuring their risk is your key to getting the job.  Are you ready?

Before I start, I want to let you in on a little secret that you may not have realized if you haven’t sat on the other side of the hiring table: There are hundreds of people applying for the same job as you.  Yup.  Unemployment rates are high and there are millions of people looking for jobs.  Therefore, the hiring manager has the job of sifting through hundreds of resumes to figure out which ones should get the opportunity to meet for an interview.  That being said, there are likely tons of candidates who are totally qualified for the job, but they completely disqualify themselves from getting an interview because the resume they submit says more than they realize.

5 Ways to Get the Job You Want

1. Spell Check – Simple right?  You would think so.  I would say that roughly 10% of the resumes I receive have spelling errors.  Twenty years ago you might have gotten away with a spelling mistake because back then, you mailed your resume to the company.  Today you are submitting resumes online.  This means that when the hiring manager opens the resume, the program within which it is opened (ie Microsoft Word, Pages, or the like) highlights the spelling errors.  My thought process when hiring is that if this person didn’t take the time to spell check their own work, they certainly are not going to do so when they are doing mine.

2. Job History – I can’t tell you the number of times that candidates apply for a job for which they have no experience and even worse, they don’t address it.  What I’m talking about here is if you are applying for a job as an office manager or executive assistant, but for the past ten years you have been working as nurse, you need to address it.  Perhaps there are tons of great reasons why your nursing background would totally qualify you for the office job, but it’s not the hiring manager’s job to connect the dots.  You need to do that and you need to do it in your resume or in the email to the hiring manager so he or she doesn’t think you accidentally applied for the wrong job.

3. Personal Development – What books have you read that would make you an awesome job candidate?  What classes have you taken to show that you are interested in developing yourself personally?  I’m not talking about college education here.  What I am talking about is that if you took sales classes at a local Dale Carnegie school, you should list them.  If you regularly attend Chamber of Commerce events, Women’s Conferences, or skill building seminars, your resume will move to the top of the pile.  One of the greatest qualities of any employee is his or her desire to learn.  If this sounds like you, make sure your resume reflects this.

4. Stand Out – There are lots of ways to make sure your resume stands out from the rest.  For example, if you are applying through an online program where the resume will get emailed, like Craigslist, make sure you have a subject line that will ensure the email will get opened.  For example, I recently opened an email from a job applicant that wrote, “You Found Me!” in the subject line.  Try a subject line like “Your search is over,” or “Will work for free.”  Of course, nobody expects that you would work for free, but why not make the offer to come in and give the employer a sample of how you work.  This aggressive offer proves that you believe you are so good that you are willing to come in and work for free to prove it.

5. Social Media – Facebook is your resume.  Before I meet with any potential candidate, I Google them.  I do this search so that I can find out what their resume isn’t telling me.  If you have recent Facebook photos of yourself dancing on a bar, you will be challenged in getting a job.  If your Facebook posts are constantly negative, good luck to you.  Do you think that this information is none of your potential employer’s business?  Maybe.  As your potential employer I would argue that anything that is publicly circulated about you online is totally my business because as my employee you represent me….you represent my brand. If you don’t like it, there are security settings so you can block others from reading your stuff.  If you don’t block it, don’t be surprised if your potential employer is using it to decide if you are worthy of a meeting.  And yes, as for me, I check Google, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

This is just part one. Stay tuned for five more tips to getting the job you want.

Stacey Alcorn is the author of REACH! and Tuned In. She is a business strategy and sales consultant for large corporations and Global Fortune 100 Firms. She is also a keynote speaker, blogger, trainer, and start-up consultant. Her sales training products have been licensed by hundreds of organizations around the world who use her one-of-a kind sales training materials as the genesis for their own brand growth. Make sure to sign up here for my REACH! Weekly News for awesome interviews with Leaders & Visionaries that I only share with my VIP members.